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English --> engmovie-000 --> engdvd-2004
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  A movie with Morricone's music
 engdvd-2004 Fat Man and Little Boy/Shadow makers (1989)
89-03-official
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"-official" is in official catalogue
Fat Man and Little Boy/Shadow makers (1989)
Fat Man and Little Boy/Shadow makers (1989)
 
About the movie from IMDB

Overview

Director:Roland Joffé

Writers (WGA):Bruce Robinson (story)
Bruce Robinson (screenplay) ...
more
Release Date:20 October 1989 (USA) more
Genre:Drama / History more
Tagline:The story of the extraordinary people who changed our world.
Plot Outline:This film reenacts the Manhattan Project, the secret wartime project in New Mexico where the first atomic bombs were designed and built. more
Plot Synopsis:This plot synopsis is empty. Add a synopsis
Plot Keywords:Los Alamos / Biographical / Historical / Robert Oppenheimer / Nuclear Weapons more
Awards:2 nominations more

 

Additional Details

Also Known As:Shadow Makers (UK)
more
Parents Guide:Add content advisory for parents
Runtime:127 min
Country:USA
Language:English
Color:Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:2.35 : 1 more
Sound Mix:Dolby

Synopsis

In real life, Robert Oppenheimer was the scientific head of the Manhattan Project, the secret wartime project in New Mexico where the first atomic bombs were designed and built. General Leslie Groves was in overall command of it. This film reenacts the project with an emphasis on their relationship. Written by Anonymous (See here)

001- About the DVD
Actors: Paul Newman, Dwight Schultz, Bonnie Bedelia, John Cusack, Laura Dern, See more
Directors: Roland Joffé
VHS Release Date: May 5, 1998
Run Time: 127 minutes
US Theatrical Release Date: October 20, 1989
MPAA: PG13
Production Company: Paramount Pictures, Lightmotive
Music: Ennio Morricone
English dub, Chinese, English, French sub, total length 127 minutes
(See here)
 
 
002- About the Movie

01-Plot Summary:


In real life, Robert Oppenheimer was the scientific head of the Manhattan Project, the secret wartime project in New Mexico where the first atomic bombs were designed and built. General Leslie Groves was in overall command of it. This film reenacts the project with an emphasis on their relationship.(See here)

 

02-Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com
Despite the combined star power in front of and behind the camera, Fat Man and Little Boy is a largely tepid retelling of the history of the Manhattan Project, the atomic testing project that led to the U.S. bombing of Japan during World War II (said bombs were dubbed "Fat Man" and "Little Boy"). The Nevada-based project is headed by General Leslie R. Groves (a testy Paul Newman) and scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer (Dwight Schultz of the TV series The A-Team), who later regretted his cooperation in the project. The problem with the film lies not with the acting, which includes solid performances by Bonnie Bedelia, Laura Dern, John Cusack, and future U.S. Senator Fred Dalton Thompson, but with the script by director Roland Joffé and Bruce Robinson (Withnail and I and Joffé's The Killing Fields). A subject as morally complex as the creation of a supreme weapon requires a strong and thoughtful script, but Fat Man and Little Boy never gets further than establishing that indeed, atomic power is something to reckon with. Joseph Sargent's 1989 made-for-TV film Day One, with Brian Dennehy as Groves and David Straithairn as Oppenheimer, covers the same story with twice the depth and avoids the pitfall of a romantic subplot (Oppenheimer's dalliance with a communist played by Natasha Richardson), which this film stumbles into. Cusack's doomed scientist is actually a combination of two real-life physicists, Harry Daghlian and Louis Slotkin, who died from radiation poisoning, albeit long after V-J Day. --Paul Gaita (See here)

03-With the serious, and occasionally sublime, back-to-back Oscar contenders The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), director Roland Joffé nearly fooled everyone into believing that a major new epicmaker of great consequence had arrived. Just as quickly, however, Joffé's promise unraveled, beginning with this mangled "historical" drama about the creation of the atomic bomb, which, sadly, bears less resemblance to the solemn purpose of his previous films than it foreshadows the misguided silliness of his subsequent change of genre, Super Mario Bros. (1993). Fat Man and Little Boy (1989) — the title a reference to the nicknames assigned to the distinctively shaped bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to bring an end to World War II — stars Paul Newman as General Leslie Groves, the U.S. Army official charged with beating the Germans in the development of nuclear weaponry. Groves assembles a team of young scientists led by Dr. Robert Oppenheimer (Dwight Schultz), questions over whose political associations are muted by his doubtless ambition to conquer the project. No doubt there is mighty grist for drama in this sprawling tale of momentous discovery in the midst of grave international conflict, but Joffé only uncovers such briefly. From the very get-go Fat Man and Little Boy is marred by a horrific miscalculation of tone, unfortunately comic in its overproduced recreation of the 1940s. The early scenes of Groves' reluctant reassignment to The Manhattan Project are too broadly played, with Newman barking his lines as if warming up for his forthcoming role the Coen Bros.' Hudsucker Proxy (Ennio Morricone's mostly anonymous score is at its very worst here, veering into screwball bombasticity). Eventually, the film settles into a less abrasive style, but fails for the first hour to create any palpable tension amongst the mostly faceless geniuses tasked with fashioning from scratch the world's deadliest weapon in 19 months. The primary failing of these early scenes lies in screenwriter Bruce Robinson's lazy decision to obscure the very science at the heart of his narrative, severely distancing the audience from the key struggle of the first half of his movie. As anyone who has ever watched a Jeff Goldblum movie (like The Race for the Double Helix or the 1986 remake of The Fly) knows, the science doesn't even have to make sense to the viewer as long as intelligent actors are given room to create a palpable thrill of discovery, but Robinson gives us a single scene of this kind, and every successive breakthrough (and tragic mishap) goes by virtually unexplained, muting their impact and leaving them empathetically meaningless. Fat Man and Little Boy finally catches some heat as Oppenheimer's team nears completion of its mission and some members began to question the morality of their work — and even petition the President to request that their two years of toil never come to fruition — nearly derailing Grove's career and, more importantly, his vision of unprecedented U.S. strength as a powerful deterrent force. This strong half-hour, however, is eventually undermined by a final stretch of uninspired, melodramatic speechifying, including Oppenheimer's wife's (Bonnie Bedelia) plea for "peace, love and understanding," and an overheated rant by the typically unstomachable John C. McGinley about the looming specter of proliferation and Armageddon. These unnecessary polemics shift the film from middling docudrama to shallow propaganda. The climactic sequence of Oppenheimer feeling the awesome power of his efforts during a test detonation is rendered impotent by bizarre over-stylization (does a mushroom cloud need stylistic augmentation for effect?). This final piece in Joffé's anti-war trilogy soils the legacy of its more powerful predecessors, and punctures his promise with an underwhelming whimper. For the most part, the performances in Fat Man and Little Boy are as flat as Robinson's simple characterizations. Schultz, previously known as the loony Murdoch on TV's "The A Team," feels mostly out of his depth in the very different, controlled character of Oppenheimer. The best performance is given by John Cusak, whose fresh-faced scientist Michael Merriman is a fictitious composite of a few real-life scientists, most notably Joseph Slotin, whose true story offers the film's most gruesome glimpse at the consequences of radioactive weaponry and also its most glaringly opportunist departure from history, as Slotin's accidental exposure to deadly radiation didn't occur until nearly a year after the events covered in Joffé's movie. Also with Laura Dern, and brief appearances by Fred Thompson and Natasha Richardson. Fat Man and Little Boy is released by Paramount in a no-frills, occasionally grainy anamorphic transfer (2.35:1) with both Dolby Digital 5.1 and Dolby 2.0 Surround audio tracks. There are no extra features, not even a trailer. Keep-case.
—Gregory P. Dorr (See here)

In real life, Robert Oppenheimer was the scientific head of the Manhattan Project, the secret wartime project in New Mexico where the first atomic bombs were designed and built. General Leslie Groves was in overall command of it. This film reenacts the project with an emphasis on their relationship.(
 
 
English dub, Chinese, English, French sub, total length 127 minutes
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